Don’t need "coding" anymore?

26 01 2010

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Sikuli is a visual technology to search and automate graphical user interfaces (GUI) using images (screenshots). The first release of Sikuli contains Sikuli Script, a visual scripting API for Jython, and Sikuli IDE, an integrated development environment for writing visual scripts with screenshots easily. Sikuli Script automates anything you see on the screen without internal API’s support. You can programmatically control a web page, a desktop application running on Windows/Linux/Mac OS X, or even an iphone application running in an emulator. http://groups.csail.mit.edu/uid/sikuli/ 
Programming Luddites may have less to fear in the future.
A new MIT project called Sikuli allows people to program using screenshots in lieu of written code. Basically, it lets you reference user interface elements like a Microsoft Word icon, Trash Can or search bar with pictures of the button or icon instead of script. .. Read the article in here
Well, keep the good job there guys, lets make these programmers work easier !!

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Orang kecil itu Berjiwa Besar

18 01 2010

Tentu banyak yang tau kehebohan Rohut Sitompul saat meminta keterangan JK di pansus beberapa waktu lalu. Banyak yg tersinggung dengan cara rohut bertanya sambil menggunakan kata “daeng” yang dianggap bernada melecehkan.
Berikut tanggapan JK yang di posting langsung oleh beliau di kompasiana http://sosbud.kompasiana.com/2010/01/16/hati-hati-memanggil-orang-bugis-dengan-daeng/
terima kasih untuk pesannya saya sudah baca tulisan anda…memang banyak yang mempersoalkan itu, tapi bagi saya pribadi, saya anggap secara kultural, panggilan “daeng” sama saja dengan panggilan “mas” di Jawa sana. meskipun kadang2 di makassar kita juga tidak suka dipanggil mas karena itu panggilan tukang bakso, sama halnya daeng boleh jadi, orang yang dipanggil tersebut akan tersinggung. Saat ini, memang panggilan daeng lebih banyak ditujukan pada profesi tukang becak, sopir angkutan, atau penjual ikan.. Tapi, situasinya berbeda dengan saat berada di Jakarta. Saat di Jakarta, saya merasakan bahwa panggilan daeng ini menjadi sapaan yang lazim di kalangan kita yang berasal dari Sulsel. Panggilan ini menjadi penanda, semacam penegasan bahwa kita berasal dari daerah yang sama, maka kita adalah saudara. Di Jakarta, seorang warga Sulsel yang memanggil sesamanya dengan panggilan daeng, dianggap sangat sopan dan menghargai sesamanya. Panggilan itu adalah pernyataan bahwa kita sesama saudara seperantauan yang saling menghormati. Jika kemudian warga etnis lain ikut-ikutan memanggil ”daeng”, maka itu dianggapnya sebagai panggilan kehormatan. saya memang sering disapa daeng oleh sesama di Jakarta. Daeng Ucu’ begitu teman2 menyapa saya. saya anggap tak ada yang salah dengan panggilan itu sebab merupakan bentuk penghormatan dan pernyataan bahwa kita sesama saudara. Jika belakangan panggilan Ruhut menimbulkan reaksi, mungkin itu dikarenakan karena intonasinya yang seakan melecehkan. Ia seolah sedang menginterogasi, dan beberapa kali mengulang kata Daeng Jusuf Kalla. Dengan intonasi seperti itu, sah-sah saja jika orang Sulsel menganggapnya pelecehan. tapi jangan berlebihan lah, memang kawan kita suka begitu… saya sendiri sampai saat ini masih merasa biasa biasa saja, dengan sudah terbiasa dengan Bung Ruhut…


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Bravo JK !!!





10 signs that it’s time to look for a new job

11 08 2009

This article was copyed from Tech Republic, maybe that can be used as consideration for you that think to quit from your current job. Good luck guys

———–
Author: Becky Roberts

Changing jobs can be a life-altering decision that requires considerable courage, especially in the current economy — but it’s easier if you’re convinced it’s the right thing to do. IT pro Becky Roberts put together a list of factors that helped her decide on a career shift.

Before I quit a job I had held for nine years and four months, I gave the topic of job-changing a great deal of thought. However bad a job may be and however much you dread Monday mornings, making the decision to leave the job — especially one you have held for some years — is never an easy process. Even if your boss is an ogre, your pay raises haven’t kept up with the cost of living, and your skills haven’t been relevant for six years, you know you can handle this job.

There’s a large degree of comfort in your current responsibilities and the company you’re familiar with. Part of your brain knows you’re capable of more, but another part is fraught with self-doubt and wakes you from sleep at 2:00 AM in a cold sweat, beaming an image of you in your new job frozen by ignorance, out of your depth, and facing termination.

So how do you know when it’s time to go? Based on my experience, here are my top 10 indicators that it’s time to make the change.
1: You know you aren’t performing to the best of your ability

We all go through slumps, bad days, even bad weeks when we just don’t care, don’t give it our best… but what if that week turns into months? If you just don’t have what it takes to give it your best, something needs to change. This is a common sign of burnout or of being overworked, underworked, underchallenged, or out of your depth.

If lack of motivation is the only issue, it may be possible to effect change within your current company by requesting different responsibilities, more training, or another position. But if none of these options is available, it’s time to update your resume.

2: You start gravitating toward coworkers you can be disgruntled with
Think about the people with whom you choose to socialize at work. Whose company do you seek out? Are you drawn toward the malcontents, the people who derive pleasure from complaining about their boss, the declining benefits, and the unreasonable overtime? When people ask you what you like about your job, is it rather like when Uncle Bob asked, “What’s your favorite subject at school?” and all you could think of was recess?

3: You can’t picture your future with your current employer
Do you remember those irritating questions the last time you were interviewed: “Where do you see yourself in three years? Five years? Ten?” Perhaps it’s time to ask yourself those questions again. But this time ask, “Do I see myself HERE in three years? Five years? Ten?” If the answer to any of these questions is “no,” what is your plan? Where do you want to go? When were you planning to make your move?

As much as we’d all like to simply wake up one day to find ourselves in the perfect job, the chance of it happening is probably slightly slimmer than a one-eyed, polka-dotted aardvark materializing in your trash compactor. If you know that you want to be working someplace else at some point in the future, it’s never too soon to make a plan.

4: You take inventory of your job’s pros and cons… and the cons win
If you’re having a hard time deciding whether to change jobs, try this simple exercise. Create a document with two lists — things you like about your current job, the pros, and things you dislike, the cons. Next, apply a weighting to the items. This can be as simple as a value from 1 to 10 to rate the importance of each factor. For example, if the stringent dress code is on your list of cons but it isn’t that important to you, give it a 1 or 2. But if the excellent health insurance is a pro, it would probably warrant at least a 7 or an 8.
Next, add up each list. If the cons outweigh the pros, it’s probably worth at least considering a change. If nothing else, this exercise will force you to focus on what you specifically do and do not like about your current position and give you a more concrete idea of what to look for in a new position.

5: You look for ways to improve your current situation but you can’t turn it into what you really want
Another useful exercise is to take your list of pros from the previous exercise and expand upon it. Elaborate on the items already on the list and add other items you wish you could claim about your current position. When you’re finished, review the list for items you may be able to make happen at your current company. If you want more responsibility or more flexible hours, you might be able to work that out, whereas if you work for a missile manufacturer and happen to have developed pacifist beliefs since accepting the position, your only reasonable option is to seek a position in a different company. In other words, before jumping ship under the assumption that a new position will make all your problems vanish in an instant, make the effort to effect improvements in your current position. If trying to make changes proves futile, you’ll be more confident that seeking a new position is the right thing to do.

6: Your skills are lagging and your position offers no opportunities to update them
How is your skill set? Are you able to keep your skills up to date? What would happen if your company went under today and you were forced onto the job market? Would you struggle to find a better or even an equivalent position because your skills are out of date? If this is the case, is there anything you can do to rectify the situation in your current position? Are there training opportunities you haven’t been taking advantage of?

If it’s not possible to stay employable in your current position, it’s definitely time to make a change, even if you enjoy the job and your company seems stable. You may be able to supplement your company’s deficit by paying for your own training, but without the opportunity to use your new skills in a work environment, such training will be of little value. To determine the current marketability of your present skill set, try searching for jobs equivalent to yours. Do you meet the minimum requirements?

7: You can’t get enough positive reinforcement to keep your spirits up
Do you feel valued? Feeling valued in your job is one of those almost indefinable benefits or forms of compensation that can’t be measured by any objective means. The degree to which someone needs to feel valued to be happy in a job varies greatly from person to person. Some people are perfectly content never to receive a word of praise or public acknowledgment of their achievements. For others, this type of recognition is more important than a generous salary.
The first step toward obtaining an appropriate position in this respect is to become aware of your own needs. The next step is to develop some techniques for determining whether these needs will be met when considering a new position, perhaps by asking appropriate questions during interviews or by finding current employees willing to talk. If you’re already in a job that you otherwise like, figure out what you need in order to feel valued and find ways to communicate these needs to the appropriate person.
If the only time your boss talks to you is to tell you that you need to do better or improve your attitude, try explaining that it would also be helpful to know when you are doing something right. Try being proactive and ask your peers, your users, or your superiors to let you know if there’s more you can do to help them. This could have the pleasant side effect of eliciting some positive feedback when they tell you that they’re perfectly satisfied with your current level of service. If you still can’t get the validation you need, it could be time to seek it elsewhere.

8: Your salary just isn’t enough

Are you paid what you’re worth? Although receiving inadequate financial compensation for your efforts is rarely the sole or even the most important reason that people change jobs, it’s a significant factor. For most people, being paid what they’re worth — at or above the going market rate for their job function — is an essential aspect of feeling valued. Don’t know what you are worth? Try looking at comparable positions on job hunting Web sites, review compensation surveys, or update your resume and submit it to a headhunter to solicit feedback.
Being paid inadequately can be particularly galling if you happen to find out that one of your less experienced and/or less qualified co-workers is being paid more. Early in my career, I was given the task of training a new employee, an assignment I took on quite willingly until I learned that despite her lack of experience, her salary was almost exactly double mine. Although I continued to train her, my enthusiasm definitely waned. My request for a mere 5 percent pay increase was denied, so I took the only reasonable course of action and secured a position with a different company. In this case, salary was not the only factor, but it was the one that finally persuaded me to make a change.

9: You want to live somewhere else
Have a great job but hate the location? Even if you have the perfect job, unless your career is the single most important aspect of your life, disliking the area in which you live or having a burning desire to live someplace else is an important factor in deciding to change jobs. Since accepting my first IT job, the need to relocate has been a significant force in my decision to change companies three out of four times. In fact, of those three, I relocated twice without even having a job to go to.

10: Your company or work situation has changed radically since you were hired
Your job used to be perfect, but now it has changed. Maybe your company was bought out or your boss retired or got reassigned. Or perhaps your company had a significant shift in operating philosophy or in its mission, and now you’re no longer working in the same environment into which you were originally hired. If such changes occur, you basically have three choices: Go with the flow and make the most of the situation, quit, or stay and complain. These types of changes can be so far-reaching in their impact upon your daily life that the result is not dissimilar to being forced to change jobs and companies. You may be going to the same physical location each day, but every other aspect of your job has been transformed. Even if you’re not unhappy with the changes, this is a good opportunity to reexamine where you are in your life and make sure you take full advantage of the new circumstances.





10 signs that it’s time to look for a new job

11 08 2009
This article was copyed from Tech Republic, maybe that can be used as consideration for you that think to quit from your current job. Good luck guys

———–
Author: Becky Roberts

Changing jobs can be a life-altering decision that requires considerable courage, especially in the current economy — but it’s easier if you’re convinced it’s the right thing to do. IT pro Becky Roberts put together a list of factors that helped her decide on a career shift.

Before I quit a job I had held for nine years and four months, I gave the topic of job-changing a great deal of thought. However bad a job may be and however much you dread Monday mornings, making the decision to leave the job — especially one you have held for some years — is never an easy process. Even if your boss is an ogre, your pay raises haven’t kept up with the cost of living, and your skills haven’t been relevant for six years, you know you can handle this job.

There’s a large degree of comfort in your current responsibilities and the company you’re familiar with. Part of your brain knows you’re capable of more, but another part is fraught with self-doubt and wakes you from sleep at 2:00 AM in a cold sweat, beaming an image of you in your new job frozen by ignorance, out of your depth, and facing termination.

So how do you know when it’s time to go? Based on my experience, here are my top 10 indicators that it’s time to make the change.
1: You know you aren’t performing to the best of your ability
We all go through slumps, bad days, even bad weeks when we just don’t care, don’t give it our best… but what if that week turns into months? If you just don’t have what it takes to give it your best, something needs to change. This is a common sign of burnout or of being overworked, underworked, underchallenged, or out of your depth.
If lack of motivation is the only issue, it may be possible to effect change within your current company by requesting different responsibilities, more training, or another position. But if none of these options is available, it’s time to update your resume.

2: You start gravitating toward coworkers you can be disgruntled with
Think about the people with whom you choose to socialize at work. Whose company do you seek out? Are you drawn toward the malcontents, the people who derive pleasure from complaining about their boss, the declining benefits, and the unreasonable overtime? When people ask you what you like about your job, is it rather like when Uncle Bob asked, “What’s your favorite subject at school?” and all you could think of was recess?

3: You can’t picture your future with your current employer
Do you remember those irritating questions the last time you were interviewed: “Where do you see yourself in three years? Five years? Ten?” Perhaps it’s time to ask yourself those questions again. But this time ask, “Do I see myself HERE in three years? Five years? Ten?” If the answer to any of these questions is “no,” what is your plan? Where do you want to go? When were you planning to make your move?
As much as we’d all like to simply wake up one day to find ourselves in the perfect job, the chance of it happening is probably slightly slimmer than a one-eyed, polka-dotted aardvark materializing in your trash compactor. If you know that you want to be working someplace else at some point in the future, it’s never too soon to make a plan.

4: You take inventory of your job’s pros and cons… and the cons win
If you’re having a hard time deciding whether to change jobs, try this simple exercise. Create a document with two lists — things you like about your current job, the pros, and things you dislike, the cons. Next, apply a weighting to the items. This can be as simple as a value from 1 to 10 to rate the importance of each factor. For example, if the stringent dress code is on your list of cons but it isn’t that important to you, give it a 1 or 2. But if the excellent health insurance is a pro, it would probably warrant at least a 7 or an 8.
Next, add up each list. If the cons outweigh the pros, it’s probably worth at least considering a change. If nothing else, this exercise will force you to focus on what you specifically do and do not like about your current position and give you a more concrete idea of what to look for in a new position.

5: You look for ways to improve your current situation but you can’t turn it into what you really want
Another useful exercise is to take your list of pros from the previous exercise and expand upon it. Elaborate on the items already on the list and add other items you wish you could claim about your current position. When you’re finished, review the list for items you may be able to make happen at your current company. If you want more responsibility or more flexible hours, you might be able to work that out, whereas if you work for a missile manufacturer and happen to have developed pacifist beliefs since accepting the position, your only reasonable option is to seek a position in a different company. In other words, before jumping ship under the assumption that a new position will make all your problems vanish in an instant, make the effort to effect improvements in your current position. If trying to make changes proves futile, you’ll be more confident that seeking a new position is the right thing to do.

6: Your skills are lagging and your position offers no opportunities to update them
How is your skill set? Are you able to keep your skills up to date? What would happen if your company went under today and you were forced onto the job market? Would you struggle to find a better or even an equivalent position because your skills are out of date? If this is the case, is there anything you can do to rectify the situation in your current position? Are there training opportunities you haven’t been taking advantage of?
If it’s not possible to stay employable in your current position, it’s definitely time to make a change, even if you enjoy the job and your company seems stable. You may be able to supplement your company’s deficit by paying for your own training, but without the opportunity to use your new skills in a work environment, such training will be of little value. To determine the current marketability of your present skill set, try searching for jobs equivalent to yours. Do you meet the minimum requirements?

7: You can’t get enough positive reinforcement to keep your spirits up
Do you feel valued? Feeling valued in your job is one of those almost indefinable benefits or forms of compensation that can’t be measured by any objective means. The degree to which someone needs to feel valued to be happy in a job varies greatly from person to person. Some people are perfectly content never to receive a word of praise or public acknowledgment of their achievements. For others, this type of recognition is more important than a generous salary.
The first step toward obtaining an appropriate position in this respect is to become aware of your own needs. The next step is to develop some techniques for determining whether these needs will be met when considering a new position, perhaps by asking appropriate questions during interviews or by finding current employees willing to talk. If you’re already in a job that you otherwise like, figure out what you need in order to feel valued and find ways to communicate these needs to the appropriate person.
If the only time your boss talks to you is to tell you that you need to do better or improve your attitude, try explaining that it would also be helpful to know when you are doing something right. Try being proactive and ask your peers, your users, or your superiors to let you know if there’s more you can do to help them. This could have the pleasant side effect of eliciting some positive feedback when they tell you that they’re perfectly satisfied with your current level of service. If you still can’t get the validation you need, it could be time to seek it elsewhere.

8: Your salary just isn’t enough
Are you paid what you’re worth? Although receiving inadequate financial compensation for your efforts is rarely the sole or even the most important reason that people change jobs, it’s a significant factor. For most people, being paid what they’re worth — at or above the going market rate for their job function — is an essential aspect of feeling valued. Don’t know what you are worth? Try looking at comparable positions on job hunting Web sites, review compensation surveys, or update your resume and submit it to a headhunter to solicit feedback.
Being paid inadequately can be particularly galling if you happen to find out that one of your less experienced and/or less qualified co-workers is being paid more. Early in my career, I was given the task of training a new employee, an assignment I took on quite willingly until I learned that despite her lack of experience, her salary was almost exactly double mine. Although I continued to train her, my enthusiasm definitely waned. My request for a mere 5 percent pay increase was denied, so I took the only reasonable course of action and secured a position with a different company. In this case, salary was not the only factor, but it was the one that finally persuaded me to make a change.

9: You want to live somewhere else
Have a great job but hate the location? Even if you have the perfect job, unless your career is the single most important aspect of your life, disliking the area in which you live or having a burning desire to live someplace else is an important factor in deciding to change jobs. Since accepting my first IT job, the need to relocate has been a significant force in my decision to change companies three out of four times. In fact, of those three, I relocated twice without even having a job to go to.

10: Your company or work situation has changed radically since you were hired
Your job used to be perfect, but now it has changed. Maybe your company was bought out or your boss retired or got reassigned. Or perhaps your company had a significant shift in operating philosophy or in its mission, and now you’re no longer working in the same environment into which you were originally hired. If such changes occur, you basically have three choices: Go with the flow and make the most of the situation, quit, or stay and complain. These types of changes can be so far-reaching in their impact upon your daily life that the result is not dissimilar to being forced to change jobs and companies. You may be going to the same physical location each day, but every other aspect of your job has been transformed. Even if you’re not unhappy with the changes, this is a good opportunity to reexamine where you are in your life and make sure you take full advantage of the new circumstances.





Tentang kebesaran jiwa

27 07 2009
Hmm..cuma ingin sharing pesan pak Mario Teguh yang sempat aku ikuti beberapa minggu lalu, tentang kualitas ‘kebesaran’ manusia. Ini dia kira – kira cukilan makna dari pembicaraan beliau itu, mudah – mudahan bermanfaat.

Orang yang ‘besar’ jika mendapat masalah akan bereaksi seperti orang ‘besar’. Hanya orang “kecil” yang merasa sakit ketika disakiti hal – hal kecil. Ambillah contoh dari orang ‘besar’, dan ketika mendapat masalah tanyakan pada diri sendiri, “jika orang ‘besar’ mendapat masalah seperti ini, apa yang akan dilakukannya ?”

Apapun masalah yang kita temui, cari yang baik, syukuri halangan itu dan bereaksilah dengan baik seperti layaknya orang ‘besar’. Karena, kualitas ‘kebesaran’ seseorang itu tidak dilihat dari reaksinya atas hal – hal yang telah ia duga atau rencanakan, tapi oleh hal – hal yang tak terduga atau bahkan yang tak pernah diharapkan.





Surviving IELTS Test

15 07 2009
[10:54:43] My Teacher > Adek, I’m sorry for the failed writing
[10:54:54] me > oh that’s fine
[10:55:11] My Teacher > was it because you didn’t finish the task?
[10:55:19] me > no, I finished the tasks
[10:55:40] me > but, I didn’t have time to check task 2 again
[10:55:46] me > only task 1
[10:55:53] me > I was so afraid I couldn’t finish task 1
[10:56:21] me > so I finished task 1 first
[10:56:23] me > I think that was my first mistake
[10:56:46] My Teacher > so task 2?
[10:56:55] me > I was too nervous when I was doing task 2 and afraid I wouldn’t finish that
[10:57:15] me > I wrote like crazy
[10:57:30] My Teacher > so not focus?
[10:57:30] me > in fact I didn’t have enough idea in my head for task 2
[10:57:52] My Teacher > #-o
[10:58:19] me > I think I was being too intimidated that I couldn’t finish the both tasks
[10:58:42] me > that makes me couldn’t thinking about some idea
[11:00:02] me > I think task 1 is ok
[11:00:32] My Teacher > so how’s the scholarship then?
[11:00:54] me > I’m still waiting for 1 more admission result
[11:01:08] My Teacher > is it OK with 6?
[11:01:19] me > yes, it just need overall 6, don’t care about partial score
[11:02:02] me > but, I think I want to try IELTS test again
[11:02:03] My Teacher > hmmm hopefully you will pass
[11:02:18] me > I want to try again
[11:02:30] My Teacher > can you tell me the individual band you got?
[11:02:37] me > yes
[11:02:43] me > listening is 6
[11:02:45] me > reading 6.5
[11:02:51] me > writing 4.5
[11:02:56] me > speaking 7
[11:02:58] me > overall 6
[11:03:41] me > I will take IELTS test again, this year
[11:04:14] My Teacher > yes, and don’t repeat the same mistake please
[11:05:00] me > yes, I will do complete writing test as my practice
[11:05:25] My Teacher > /:-) are u sure?
[11:05:30] My Teacher > no more panic?
[11:06:23] me > yes, I just did separated practice before
[11:06:34] me > only task 1
[11:06:37] me > or only task 2
[11:06:58] me > that make me very nervous when I face them both at the same time
[11:07:04] My Teacher > Time you’re writing
[11:07:11] My Teacher > use stopwatch
[11:08:41] me > ok
[11:09:41] me > do u have some suggestion for practice formula in special purpose like this?
[11:10:07] My Teacher > you need someone to watch your writing
[11:10:20] me > watch?
[11:10:23] me > what for?
[11:10:33] My Teacher > what shall you do in first 15 minutes and so on
[11:10:57] My Teacher > so he can check your writing steps
[11:11:06] me > is that important?
[11:11:31] me > Melanie said, do task 2 at the first 40 minutes and after that task 1
[11:12:04] My Teacher > I told you that before right?
[11:12:07] me > yes
[11:12:27] My Teacher > spend only 20 minutes max in task 1
[11:12:45] me > yes
[11:12:46] me > and I didn’t do that because I was too panic
[11:13:03] me > I did task 1 exactly in 20 minute,
[11:13:39] me > but did it first not at second
[11:13:59] me > I was speculating in that, hope that will reduce my nervous
[11:14:29] me > so what is your advice in my practice?
[11:15:18] My Teacher > that’s it…plan your writing, time it well
[11:15:55] me > ok. I will take test at May or June
[11:16:57] My Teacher > keep sending me your writing
[11:18:19] me > the last question
[11:18:38] My Teacher > so I can check your grammar as well
[11:18:43] My Teacher > What?
[11:18:57] me > what do u think about my individual band?
[11:19:21] me > what else should I worry about?
[11:19:59] My Teacher > Listening I think
[11:20:12] me > Why?
[11:21:30] me > I think that was some coincidence when I got reading higher than listening
[11:23:16] My Teacher > No, you are a good thinker
[11:23:28] My Teacher > that’s why you got good in listening
[11:24:05] me > thank u, but there’ so many traps in there
[11:24:13] me > both listening and reading
[11:25:58] me > but I think real reading test more enjoyable because it’s more easy to read and the paper more is better too
[11:26:02] My Teacher > Just stay focus…That’s all
[11:26:05] me > okay, thanks
[11:26:57] My Teacher > yes, it’s all about understanding English
[11:27:11] me > I get that
[11:29:05] me > okay rick, see ya soon
[11:29:21] My Teacher > Right

So…That’s some part of my story to get win for IELTS test.

As you can read, I failed in writing test. Like most IELTS test candidates, I must reach specific score in individual (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) test and overall test so i can to use this IELTS test result. That numbers are minimum 5.5 for listening, reading and speaking test; minimum 5 for writing test; and minimum 6 for overall. You can see in conversation above and document bellow, my weaknesses are spelling, grammar and too complicated concepts to be though (it’s just like what my teacher ever said, and I agree with him. I think that’s because I’m koleric-melancolic type :P)

I took IELTS test for the first time in IALF Jakarta at January 2009, cost 180 US dollar. I joined IELTS preparation course in that institution too at December 2008, Monday to Friday begin from 07.00 pm until 09.00 pm. At that time, I always run from my office exactly at 05.00 o’clock in the afternoon to take Transjakarta busway as soon as possible to Kuningan (as you know, that’s crowded time), so I could arrived at IALF before 06.00 pm, took 2 sessions of listening or reading test each day before class begin. My Teacher is Melanie, native speaker from New Zeland. I ever heard that native people from that country is the fastest English speakers in the world. After that course, I contacted a new teacher, -I call him Rick-, to help me to rise my speaking and writing skill. We got private meeting each Sunday, 3 hours for 4 or 5 weeks. They are good teacher that ever teach me.

I was hoping, that’s all (include independent practice at home and friend) will give me more point to rise my capability in English language. But, that’s only hope, because I realize the main secret to pass this IELTS test is: 1. Pray, 2. practice, practice, practice and 3. Confidence. That’s enough to give all tricks to win. That’s all, no luck in here. I was losing that last item at the last minute. But it’s ok, because I already faced that fact, learning my weakness, and I will take more practice to take IELTS test again. For me, pass this test is only 1 small gate in my long journey to catch my dreams. So, I will never give up with this. This is my next target: minimum 6 for individual band score and 7 for overall band score. You will become my witness for this target. Will you?

Hmm… IELTS test? I will see you very sooner, this year. Amien. Here is some information that I take form “IELTS information for Candidates” document and other documents too.

What is IELTS ?
IELTS, the International English Language Testing System, is designed to assess the language ability of candidates who need to study or work where English is the language of communication.

IELTS is jointly managed by University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations (Cambridge ESOL), British Council and IDP: IELTS Australia. IELTS conforms to the highest international standards of language assessment. It covers the four language skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking.

IELTS is recognized by universities and employers in many countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zeland, the UK and the USA. It is also recognised by professional bodies, immigration authorities and other government agencies. Please refer to a full list of recognizing organizations on the IELTS website http://www.ielts.org IELTS is not recommended for candidates under the age of 16.

Test Administration
IELTS tests are administered at centers throughout the world – there are more than 300 centers, in over 100 countries. A full list of centers is available on the IELTS website http://www.ielts.org

IELTS is available up to 4 times in a month. To take the test, you can contact the relevant centre for exact test dates. You will only receive one copy of your test result and replacement copies will not be provided. Additional copies can be sent direct to receiving organizations and institutions by test centers. Registered organizations can receive test results electronically through the E Downloads service. There are no restrictions on every candidate to re-taking the test.

Academic and General Training

IELTS is available in two formats – Academic and General Training.
The Academic Module assesses whether a candidate is ready to study or train in the medium of English at an undergraduate or postgraduate level. Admission to undergraduate and postgraduate courses should be based on the results of this module.

The General Training Module emphasizes basic survival skills in a broad social and educational context. General Training is suitable for candidates who are going to English-speaking countries to complete their secondary education, to undertake work experience or training programs not at degree level, or for immigration purposes to Australia, Canada and New Zeland. The General Training Module is not offered at all test administrations. If in doubt about which module to take, contact the organization to which you are applying for their requirements.

Test Format
You are tested in listening, reading, writing and speaking. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking tests. There is a choice of Reading and Writing tests – Academic or General Training. It is your responsibility to tell the Administrator which version, Academic or General Training that you need to take.

The tests are designed to cover the full range of ability from non-user to expert user. The first three tests – Listening, Reading and Writing – must be completed in one day. No break is given between the three tests. The Speaking test may be taken, at the discretion of the test centre, in the period seven days before or after the other three tests.

Preparing For The Test
It is not necessary to attend a preparation course but it is, of course, a good idea to prepare thoroughly for the test. Official Practice Materials are available from test centers, or directly from Cambridge ESOL or IDP:IELTS Australia. This includes a full practice test with an answer key, a CD of the Listening test and three sample Speaking tests so that candidates can get some idea of their level and familiarize themselves with the format of the test. There is also a wide range of published preparation materials.

IELTS Test Results
Results will be produced 13 days after the test. At some centers you may collect your results on the 13th day; at others results are mailed on the 13th day. Test centers are not permitted to give results over the phone or by fax or email. Replacement Test Report Forms are not provided in case of loss.

A score is reported for each of the tests. The individual test scores are then calculated to produce an Overall Band Score. Overall Band Scores are reported in whole and half bands for each test. Table below is interpretation with some information on score processing:


The IELTS tests have been designed to reflect accurately the candidate’s abilities to deal with the English language. The design of the test makes it statistically unlikely that there will be a great variation in the test scores. In order to ensure that a candidate’s IELTS results genuinely reflect that candidate’s English language abilities, where there are exceptionally unusual patterns of test scores the tests will be marked again, and the IELTS Test Partners may ask the candidate to re-take some or all of the tests. You will not be charged for any such retakes and will not be issued with your result until after the re-take.

The Test Report Form
The Test Report Form includes a large number of security features, and the authenticity of any Test Report Form can be verified through the online verification service. Cambridge ESOL, British Council and IDP: IELTS Australia reserves the right to cancel any IELTS Test Report Form in the event of any attempt to tamper with or misuse the information it contains.

The IELTS Test Partners recommend that Receiving Organizations do not accept a Test Report Form that is more than two years old. For this reason, Test Report Forms will not be issued for tests taken more than two years ago. A Receiving Organization may choose to accept an older Test Report Form if a candidate can provide evidence that they have actively maintained or tried to improve their English language proficiency since doing the test. However, this is the decision of the Receiving Organization, not the IELTS Test Partners. The IELTS Test Partners cannot provide any letters or references endorsing a candidate’s level of English.

Test
Each candidate takes four tests, one in each of the four skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking. Candidates who request a postponement or cancellation of their test within 5 weeks of the test date will be charged the full fee unless they are able to provide appropriate medical evidence to support their request. Medical evidence must be provided no later than 5 days after the test date. An administrative fee may be deducted from any refund.

Listening
The Listening test takes around 30 minutes. There are 40 questions and four sections. The Listening test is recorded on a CD and is played ONCE only.

During the test, time is given for candidates to read the questions and write down and then check their answers. Answers are written on the question paper as candidates listen. When the recording ends, 10 minutes are allowed for candidates to transfer their answers to an answer sheet.

The first two sections are concerned with social needs. There is a conversation between two speakers and then a monologue.

The final two sections are concerned with situations related more closely to educational or training contexts. There is a conversation between up to four people and then a further monologue. A range of native-speaker English accents are used in the recordings which reflect the international usage of IELTS.

You will be reminded during the test to transfer your answers to the answer sheet. In the Listening test 10 minutes is allocated specifically for this purpose. In the Reading test, you may transfer your answers at any time during the one hour test period. If you do not transfer your answers during the test, you will not be given any extra time to do so. Responses provided on the question papers cannot be considered for marking purposes.

Reading

The Reading test takes 60 minutes. There are 40 questions, based on three reading passages with a total of 2,000 to 2,750 words. Both the Academic Reading and General Training Reading tests have the same format.
All answers must be entered on an answer sheet during the 60-minute test. No extra time is allowed for transferring answers.

-Academic Reading
Texts are taken from magazines, journals, books, and newspapers. Texts have been written for a non-specialist audience. At least one text contains detailed logical argument. Texts may contain non-verbal materials such as diagrams, graphs or illustrations. If texts contain technical terms then a simple glossary is provided.

-General Training Reading
The first section, ‘social survival’, contains texts relevant to basic linguistic survival in English with tasks mainly about retrieving and providing general factual information. ‘Training survival’, the second section, focuses on the training context, for example on the training program itself or on welfare needs. This section involves a text or texts of more complex language with some precise or elaborated expression. The third section, ‘general reading’, involves reading more extended prose with a more complex structure but with the emphasis on descriptive and instructive rather than argumentative texts, in a general context relevant to the wide range of candidates involved.

You should take care when writing answers on the Listening and Reading answer sheets as incorrect spelling and grammar are penalized. Both UK and US varieties of spelling are acceptable. If you are asked to write an answer using a certain number of words and/or (a) number(s), they will be penalized if they exceed this requirement. For example, if a question specifies an answer using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS and the correct answer is ‘black leather coat’, the answer ‘coat of black leather’ is incorrect.

In questions where you are expected to complete a gap, you should only transfer the necessary missing word(s) onto the answer sheet. For example, if you have to complete ‘in the ……………’ and the correct answer is ‘morning’ the answer ‘in the morning’ would be incorrect. You should read and follow the instructions and questions very carefully. In the Listening test especially, care also should be taken when transferring answers onto the answer sheet.

Writing

The Writing test takes 60 minutes. There are two tasks to complete. It is suggested that about 20 minutes is spent on Task 1 which requires candidates to write at least 150 words. Task 2 requires at least 250 words and should take about 40 minutes.

Answers must be given on the answer sheet and must be written in full. Notes or bullet points in whole or in part are not acceptable as answers. You should note that scripts under the required minimum word limit will be penalized.

-Academic Writing
In Task 1, you are asked to describe some information (graph/table/chart/diagram), and to present the description in their own words. You may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event.

In Task 2, you are presented with a point of view or argument or problem. You need to demonstrate your ability to respond appropriately in terms of content, vocabulary and the organization of ideas. Appropriate responses are descriptions/summaries (Task 1) and short essays (Task 2) and these should be formal in style.
-General Training Writing
In Task 1, you will be asked to respond to a given problem with a letter requesting information or explaining a situation.

In Task 2, you will be presented with a point of view or argument or problem. You need to demonstrate your ability to respond appropriately in terms of content, vocabulary and the organization of ideas. Appropriate responses are personal, semi-formal or formal correspondence (Task 1) and short essays (Task 2). In General Training Writing Task 2 a slightly more personal response is more acceptable than in Academic Writing Task 2.

Speaking
The Speaking test takes between 11 and 14 minutes and consists of an oral interview between the candidate and an examiner. All Speaking tests are recorded.

In Part 1, you will be asked about general questions about yourself, you home/family, you job/study, your interest, and a range of familiar topic areas. This part lasts between 4 and 5 minutes.

In Part 2, you will be given a verbal prompt on a card and asked to talk on a particular topic. You have 1 minute to prepare before speaking at length for up to 2 minutes. The examiner then asks 1 or 2 rounding-off questions.

In Part 3, you and the examiner engage in a discussion of more abstract issues and concepts which are thematically linked to the topic prompt in Part 2. The discussion lasts between 4 and 5 minutes.

This picture above is concluion for all the IELTS test subject :

IELTS vs. TOEFL
Many people asking about comparation between IELTS and TOEFL, which one is difficult that the other. I heard, some people said TOEFL is more difficult, but some others said IELTS is more difficult. But, as I know –even I never take real TOEFL test except prediction tests in my campus-, we cannot compare that, because it has different type of test.
Also, both of these tests are already being accepted internationally: Europe, Canada, Australia or America. So, it depends on your requirement, what kind of test that you need? What is your limit time to get the result? What test that you are already familiar and confidence with? Because of that’s several constraints (I don’t compare the cost of each of that), -I think- just take your decision, prepare yourself, and move on.

Here you can see the several equivalency tables for TOEFL and IELTS scores :


this is another conversion table, where the levels proficiency in English are shown :

Source: Vancouver English

Okay, I hope this all can give some global picture to you that never face IELTS, before take the real Test . You can also do some research and make your independent practice this test, example at this website http://www.ielts-exam.net, http://www.ialf.edu or http://www.indonesia.idp.com . Wish you all luck and success. Dont’ be afraid and never give up !!






Surviving IELTS Test

15 07 2009
[10:54:43] My Teacher > Adek, I’m sorry for the failed writing
[10:54:54] me > oh that’s fine
[10:55:11] My Teacher > was it because you didn’t finish the task?
[10:55:19] me > no, I finished the tasks
[10:55:40] me > but, I didn’t have time to check task 2 again
[10:55:46] me > only task 1
[10:55:53] me > I was so afraid I couldn’t finish task 1
[10:56:21] me > so I finished task 1 first
[10:56:23] me > I think that was my first mistake
[10:56:46] My Teacher > so task 2?
[10:56:55] me > I was too nervous when I was doing task 2 and afraid I wouldn’t finish that
[10:57:15] me > I wrote like crazy
[10:57:30] My Teacher > so not focus?
[10:57:30] me > in fact I didn’t have enough idea in my head for task 2
[10:57:52] My Teacher > #-o
[10:58:19] me > I think I was being too intimidated that I couldn’t finish the both tasks
[10:58:42] me > that makes me couldn’t thinking about some idea
[11:00:02] me > I think task 1 is ok
[11:00:32] My Teacher > so how’s the scholarship then?
[11:00:54] me > I’m still waiting for 1 more admission result
[11:01:08] My Teacher > is it OK with 6?
[11:01:19] me > yes, it just need overall 6, don’t care about partial score
[11:02:02] me > but, I think I want to try IELTS test again
[11:02:03] My Teacher > hmmm hopefully you will pass
[11:02:18] me > I want to try again
[11:02:30] My Teacher > can you tell me the individual band you got?
[11:02:37] me > yes
[11:02:43] me > listening is 6
[11:02:45] me > reading 6.5
[11:02:51] me > writing 4.5
[11:02:56] me > speaking 7
[11:02:58] me > overall 6
[11:03:41] me > I will take IELTS test again, this year
[11:04:14] My Teacher > yes, and don’t repeat the same mistake please
[11:05:00] me > yes, I will do complete writing test as my practice
[11:05:25] My Teacher > /:-) are u sure?
[11:05:30] My Teacher > no more panic?
[11:06:23] me > yes, I just did separated practice before
[11:06:34] me > only task 1
[11:06:37] me > or only task 2
[11:06:58] me > that make me very nervous when I face them both at the same time
[11:07:04] My Teacher > Time you’re writing
[11:07:11] My Teacher > use stopwatch
[11:08:41] me > ok
[11:09:41] me > do u have some suggestion for practice formula in special purpose like this?
[11:10:07] My Teacher > you need someone to watch your writing
[11:10:20] me > watch?
[11:10:23] me > what for?
[11:10:33] My Teacher > what shall you do in first 15 minutes and so on
[11:10:57] My Teacher > so he can check your writing steps
[11:11:06] me > is that important?
[11:11:31] me > Melanie said, do task 2 at the first 40 minutes and after that task 1
[11:12:04] My Teacher > I told you that before right?
[11:12:07] me > yes
[11:12:27] My Teacher > spend only 20 minutes max in task 1
[11:12:45] me > yes
[11:12:46] me > and I didn’t do that because I was too panic
[11:13:03] me > I did task 1 exactly in 20 minute,
[11:13:39] me > but did it first not at second
[11:13:59] me > I was speculating in that, hope that will reduce my nervous
[11:14:29] me > so what is your advice in my practice?
[11:15:18] My Teacher > that’s it…plan your writing, time it well
[11:15:55] me > ok. I will take test at May or June
[11:16:57] My Teacher > keep sending me your writing
[11:18:19] me > the last question
[11:18:38] My Teacher > so I can check your grammar as well
[11:18:43] My Teacher > What?
[11:18:57] me > what do u think about my individual band?
[11:19:21] me > what else should I worry about?
[11:19:59] My Teacher > Listening I think
[11:20:12] me > Why?
[11:21:30] me > I think that was some coincidence when I got reading higher than listening
[11:23:16] My Teacher > No, you are a good thinker
[11:23:28] My Teacher > that’s why you got good in listening
[11:24:05] me > thank u, but there’ so many traps in there
[11:24:13] me > both listening and reading
[11:25:58] me > but I think real reading test more enjoyable because it’s more easy to read and the paper more is better too
[11:26:02] My Teacher > Just stay focus…That’s all
[11:26:05] me > okay, thanks
[11:26:57] My Teacher > yes, it’s all about understanding English
[11:27:11] me > I get that
[11:29:05] me > okay rick, see ya soon
[11:29:21] My Teacher > Right

So…That’s some part of my story to get win for IELTS test.

As you can read, I failed in writing test. Like most IELTS test candidates, I must reach specific score in individual (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) test and overall test so i can to use this IELTS test result. That numbers are minimum 5.5 for listening, reading and speaking test; minimum 5 for writing test; and minimum 6 for overall. You can see in conversation above and document bellow, my weaknesses are spelling, grammar and too complicated concepts to be though (it’s just like what my teacher ever said, and I agree with him. I think that’s because I’m koleric-melancolic type :P)

I took IELTS test for the first time in IALF Jakarta at January 2009, cost 180 US dollar. I joined IELTS preparation course in that institution too at December 2008, Monday to Friday begin from 07.00 pm until 09.00 pm. At that time, I always run from my office exactly at 05.00 o’clock in the afternoon to take Transjakarta busway as soon as possible to Kuningan (as you know, that’s crowded time), so I could arrived at IALF before 06.00 pm, took 2 sessions of listening or reading test each day before class begin. My Teacher is Melanie, native speaker from New Zeland. I ever heard that native people from that country is the fastest English speakers in the world. After that course, I contacted a new teacher, -I call him Rick-, to help me to rise my speaking and writing skill. We got private meeting each Sunday, 3 hours for 4 or 5 weeks. They are good teacher that ever teach me.

I was hoping, that’s all (include independent practice at home and friend) will give me more point to rise my capability in English language. But, that’s only hope, because I realize the main secret to pass this IELTS test is: 1. Pray, 2. practice, practice, practice and 3. Confidence. That’s enough to give all tricks to win. That’s all, no luck in here. I was losing that last item at the last minute. But it’s ok, because I already faced that fact, learning my weakness, and I will take more practice to take IELTS test again. For me, pass this test is only 1 small gate in my long journey to catch my dreams. So, I will never give up with this. This is my next target: minimum 6 for individual band score and 7 for overall band score. You will become my witness for this target. Will you?

Hmm… IELTS test? I will see you very sooner, this year. Amien. Here is some information that I take form “IELTS information for Candidates” document and other documents too.

What is IELTS ?
IELTS, the International English Language Testing System, is designed to assess the language ability of candidates who need to study or work where English is the language of communication.

IELTS is jointly managed by University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations (Cambridge ESOL), British Council and IDP: IELTS Australia. IELTS conforms to the highest international standards of language assessment. It covers the four language skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking.

IELTS is recognized by universities and employers in many countries, including Australia, Canada, New Zeland, the UK and the USA. It is also recognised by professional bodies, immigration authorities and other government agencies. Please refer to a full list of recognizing organizations on the IELTS website http://www.ielts.org IELTS is not recommended for candidates under the age of 16.

Test Administration
IELTS tests are administered at centers throughout the world – there are more than 300 centers, in over 100 countries. A full list of centers is available on the IELTS website http://www.ielts.org

IELTS is available up to 4 times in a month. To take the test, you can contact the relevant centre for exact test dates. You will only receive one copy of your test result and replacement copies will not be provided. Additional copies can be sent direct to receiving organizations and institutions by test centers. Registered organizations can receive test results electronically through the E Downloads service. There are no restrictions on every candidate to re-taking the test.

Academic and General Training

IELTS is available in two formats – Academic and General Training.
The Academic Module assesses whether a candidate is ready to study or train in the medium of English at an undergraduate or postgraduate level. Admission to undergraduate and postgraduate courses should be based on the results of this module.

The General Training Module emphasizes basic survival skills in a broad social and educational context. General Training is suitable for candidates who are going to English-speaking countries to complete their secondary education, to undertake work experience or training programs not at degree level, or for immigration purposes to Australia, Canada and New Zeland. The General Training Module is not offered at all test administrations. If in doubt about which module to take, contact the organization to which you are applying for their requirements.

Test Format
You are tested in listening, reading, writing and speaking. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking tests. There is a choice of Reading and Writing tests – Academic or General Training. It is your responsibility to tell the Administrator which version, Academic or General Training that you need to take.

The tests are designed to cover the full range of ability from non-user to expert user. The first three tests – Listening, Reading and Writing – must be completed in one day. No break is given between the three tests. The Speaking test may be taken, at the discretion of the test centre, in the period seven days before or after the other three tests.

Preparing For The Test
It is not necessary to attend a preparation course but it is, of course, a good idea to prepare thoroughly for the test. Official Practice Materials are available from test centers, or directly from Cambridge ESOL or IDP:IELTS Australia. This includes a full practice test with an answer key, a CD of the Listening test and three sample Speaking tests so that candidates can get some idea of their level and familiarize themselves with the format of the test. There is also a wide range of published preparation materials.

IELTS Test Results
Results will be produced 13 days after the test. At some centers you may collect your results on the 13th day; at others results are mailed on the 13th day. Test centers are not permitted to give results over the phone or by fax or email. Replacement Test Report Forms are not provided in case of loss.

A score is reported for each of the tests. The individual test scores are then calculated to produce an Overall Band Score. Overall Band Scores are reported in whole and half bands for each test. Table below is interpretation with some information on score processing:


The IELTS tests have been designed to reflect accurately the candidate’s abilities to deal with the English language. The design of the test makes it statistically unlikely that there will be a great variation in the test scores. In order to ensure that a candidate’s IELTS results genuinely reflect that candidate’s English language abilities, where there are exceptionally unusual patterns of test scores the tests will be marked again, and the IELTS Test Partners may ask the candidate to re-take some or all of the tests. You will not be charged for any such retakes and will not be issued with your result until after the re-take.

The Test Report Form
The Test Report Form includes a large number of security features, and the authenticity of any Test Report Form can be verified through the online verification service. Cambridge ESOL, British Council and IDP: IELTS Australia reserves the right to cancel any IELTS Test Report Form in the event of any attempt to tamper with or misuse the information it contains.

The IELTS Test Partners recommend that Receiving Organizations do not accept a Test Report Form that is more than two years old. For this reason, Test Report Forms will not be issued for tests taken more than two years ago. A Receiving Organization may choose to accept an older Test Report Form if a candidate can provide evidence that they have actively maintained or tried to improve their English language proficiency since doing the test. However, this is the decision of the Receiving Organization, not the IELTS Test Partners. The IELTS Test Partners cannot provide any letters or references endorsing a candidate’s level of English.

Test
Each candidate takes four tests, one in each of the four skills – listening, reading, writing and speaking. Candidates who request a postponement or cancellation of their test within 5 weeks of the test date will be charged the full fee unless they are able to provide appropriate medical evidence to support their request. Medical evidence must be provided no later than 5 days after the test date. An administrative fee may be deducted from any refund.

Listening
The Listening test takes around 30 minutes. There are 40 questions and four sections. The Listening test is recorded on a CD and is played ONCE only.

During the test, time is given for candidates to read the questions and write down and then check their answers. Answers are written on the question paper as candidates listen. When the recording ends, 10 minutes are allowed for candidates to transfer their answers to an answer sheet.

The first two sections are concerned with social needs. There is a conversation between two speakers and then a monologue.

The final two sections are concerned with situations related more closely to educational or training contexts. There is a conversation between up to four people and then a further monologue. A range of native-speaker English accents are used in the recordings which reflect the international usage of IELTS.

You will be reminded during the test to transfer your answers to the answer sheet. In the Listening test 10 minutes is allocated specifically for this purpose. In the Reading test, you may transfer your answers at any time during the one hour test period. If you do not transfer your answers during the test, you will not be given any extra time to do so. Responses provided on the question papers cannot be considered for marking purposes.

Reading

The Reading test takes 60 minutes. There are 40 questions, based on three reading passages with a total of 2,000 to 2,750 words. Both the Academic Reading and General Training Reading tests have the same format.
All answers must be entered on an answer sheet during the 60-minute test. No extra time is allowed for transferring answers.

-Academic Reading
Texts are taken from magazines, journals, books, and newspapers. Texts have been written for a non-specialist audience. At least one text contains detailed logical argument. Texts may contain non-verbal materials such as diagrams, graphs or illustrations. If texts contain technical terms then a simple glossary is provided.

-General Training Reading
The first section, ‘social survival’, contains texts relevant to basic linguistic survival in English with tasks mainly about retrieving and providing general factual information. ‘Training survival’, the second section, focuses on the training context, for example on the training program itself or on welfare needs. This section involves a text or texts of more complex language with some precise or elaborated expression. The third section, ‘general reading’, involves reading more extended prose with a more complex structure but with the emphasis on descriptive and instructive rather than argumentative texts, in a general context relevant to the wide range of candidates involved.

You should take care when writing answers on the Listening and Reading answer sheets as incorrect spelling and grammar are penalized. Both UK and US varieties of spelling are acceptable. If you are asked to write an answer using a certain number of words and/or (a) number(s), they will be penalized if they exceed this requirement. For example, if a question specifies an answer using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS and the correct answer is ‘black leather coat’, the answer ‘coat of black leather’ is incorrect.

In questions where you are expected to complete a gap, you should only transfer the necessary missing word(s) onto the answer sheet. For example, if you have to complete ‘in the ……………’ and the correct answer is ‘morning’ the answer ‘in the morning’ would be incorrect. You should read and follow the instructions and questions very carefully. In the Listening test especially, care also should be taken when transferring answers onto the answer sheet.

Writing

The Writing test takes 60 minutes. There are two tasks to complete. It is suggested that about 20 minutes is spent on Task 1 which requires candidates to write at least 150 words. Task 2 requires at least 250 words and should take about 40 minutes.

Answers must be given on the answer sheet and must be written in full. Notes or bullet points in whole or in part are not acceptable as answers. You should note that scripts under the required minimum word limit will be penalized.

-Academic Writing
In Task 1, you are asked to describe some information (graph/table/chart/diagram), and to present the description in their own words. You may be asked to describe and explain data, describe the stages of a process, how something works or describe an object or event.

In Task 2, you are presented with a point of view or argument or problem. You need to demonstrate your ability to respond appropriately in terms of content, vocabulary and the organization of ideas. Appropriate responses are descriptions/summaries (Task 1) and short essays (Task 2) and these should be formal in style.
-General Training Writing
In Task 1, you will be asked to respond to a given problem with a letter requesting information or explaining a situation.

In Task 2, you will be presented with a point of view or argument or problem. You need to demonstrate your ability to respond appropriately in terms of content, vocabulary and the organization of ideas. Appropriate responses are personal, semi-formal or formal correspondence (Task 1) and short essays (Task 2). In General Training Writing Task 2 a slightly more personal response is more acceptable than in Academic Writing Task 2.

Speaking
The Speaking test takes between 11 and 14 minutes and consists of an oral interview between the candidate and an examiner. All Speaking tests are recorded.

In Part 1, you will be asked about general questions about yourself, you home/family, you job/study, your interest, and a range of familiar topic areas. This part lasts between 4 and 5 minutes.

In Part 2, you will be given a verbal prompt on a card and asked to talk on a particular topic. You have 1 minute to prepare before speaking at length for up to 2 minutes. The examiner then asks 1 or 2 rounding-off questions.

In Part 3, you and the examiner engage in a discussion of more abstract issues and concepts which are thematically linked to the topic prompt in Part 2. The discussion lasts between 4 and 5 minutes.

This picture above is concluion for all the IELTS test subject :

IELTS vs. TOEFL
Many people asking about comparation between IELTS and TOEFL, which one is difficult that the other. I heard, some people said TOEFL is more difficult, but some others said IELTS is more difficult. But, as I know –even I never take real TOEFL test except prediction tests in my campus-, we cannot compare that, because it has different type of test.
Also, both of these tests are already being accepted internationally: Europe, Canada, Australia or America. So, it depends on your requirement, what kind of test that you need? What is your limit time to get the result? What test that you are already familiar and confidence with? Because of that’s several constraints (I don’t compare the cost of each of that), -I think- just take your decision, prepare yourself, and move on.

Here you can see the several equivalency tables for TOEFL and IELTS scores :


this is another conversion table, where the levels proficiency in English are shown :

Source: Vancouver English

Okay, I hope this all can give some global picture to you that never face IELTS, before take the real Test . You can also do some research and make your independent practice this test, example at this website http://www.ielts-exam.net, http://www.ialf.edu or http://www.indonesia.idp.com . Wish you all luck and success. Dont’ be afraid and never give up !!